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    Anonymous
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    One thing I have learned in sobriety is to regard my alcoholism as something to be treated. Had I not decided years ago that I needed help to stop drinking, I probably would be dead now, so bad had my drinking become. I was, for want of a better definition, a low bottom alcoholic. Years upon years of dire consequences weren’t convincing enough for me to stop. My whole existence revolved around bottle after bottle. One morning, the pain was such that I realized I would rather die than go through another day of being the empty shell of a man I had become. I stumbled to me feet, managed to get dressed and walked to the nearest hospital. Luckily, I was admitted to the psychiatric ward immediately and started a medical detox. A few days in, some people brought in an AA meeting. I listened to what was said, and was given a copy of the Big Book.

    To this day, I thank whatever forces were at work that morning for steering me to the hospital instead of the liquor store. The doctors and nurses who stabilized me were the beginning of treatment for my alcoholism. Treatment continues today. One day at a time.

    Freedom from active alcoholism is possible for all who want it.
    A little willingness is sometimes all that is required for a journey towards a better life to begin. To those of you still seeking freedom, I wish you success.

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