Search for Addiction Treatment Centers Near You Forums Substance Abuse Common Symptoms that can lead to Relapse

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  • #30876
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    In recovery it is important to be aware of the symptoms that can lead a person to relapse. These behaviors or ways of thinking have proven to have harmful effects and consequences on the maintenance of the recovery process. It is suggested that you remain mindful of these symptoms in caring for yourself.

    1. Dishonesty: This begins a pattern of unnecessary little lies and deceits with fellow workers, friends, and family. The next step is you start lying to yourself. This is called rationalization- making excuses for not doing what you know you need to do, or pretending to do other things in lieu of what really needs to be done.

    2. Impatience: You feel like things are not happening fast enough. Or others are not doing what you want them to do, in the way you want them to do it. Remember, using drugs or alcohol is about immediate gratification. Recovery is about being patient and honestly trusting the process.

    3. Argumentative: Arguing small and ridiculous points of view indicates a need to always be right. “Why don’t you be reasonable and agree with me?” Ask yourself “Do I always have to be right, and possibly alone?” Look at why you provoke arguments. Could it be you are setting up a justification in order to relapse!

    4. It won’t happen to me, syndrome: This is very dangerous thinking. Almost anything can happen to you if you get careless in your recovery. Remember, you have a progressive disease, and if you start using or drinking again, you start up where you left off when you quit.

    5. Cockiness: So, you think you’ve got it made. You no longer fear your addiction. You start testing yourself, trying to prove to yourself and others that the problem is fixed, cured, or went away. Do this often enough and it will wear down your defenses. Before you know it you are using just a little on weekends, and then during the week. You know the pattern…

    6. Complacency: It is very dangerous to let up on all the disciplines that have been structuring you recovery. When you get complacent and start taking your recovery for granted you are setting yourself up for the fall. It is always better to have a little fear about relapsing than no fear at all.

    7. Expectations: “I have changed, why hasn’t everyone else?” It is always a plus if they do although it is still your recovery even if they choose not to change. People may not accept you yet, and may still be looking for further proof that you can stay clean and sober. It is not wise to expect others to change their lifestyle and attitude just because you have decided to make a life-saving change.

    Remember: Be careful with yourself. Life will be less stressful and more enjoyable.

    From: http://www.addictionrecoverybasics.com/

    #159198
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Step 1 is a big one for me. I start to justify my use. I had a bad day, so I “deserve” to be able to unwind with my doc.

    It’s all very tiring.

    #159191
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Yep. 2, 6 & 7 were biggies for me.

    #159193
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Great post! I will copy it to the Alcoholism forum if thats ok?

    #159194
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Thanx Doug..I will copy this one for the frig..so true , so true!!
    love north

    #159192
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Hey,

    1,2,7 for me I need to be constantly reminded of these things! Thanks doug!!

    #159195
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Thanks Doug! Reading this kind of stuff over and over is part of what’s gotten me this far so far.:c031:

    #159200
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Thanks. I had a similar worksheet given to me in the last rehab I was in. I think it had 12 items. I posted it on my refridge. Valid points…each one.

    #159197
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Doug, Good points and they work for us Codies in recovery too:) Thanks, Marle

    #159196
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    #1 and # 6 are bad one’s for me, along with resentment.

    #159199
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Wow. Thanks for that – those points are really interesting.

    I relapsed a few days ago and looking at that I realise it had a lot to do with number 1, 2 and 3

    :uzi2:

    #159201
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Well…I couldn’t help myself. I had to go up in the attic and dig up all my old hand-outs and worksheets from all the rehabs I had the “pleasure” of being enrolled in over the years. And guess what? I found the sheet I was looking for. The words are almost EXACTLY as written, and instead of 7 symptoms or “warning signs” of relapse, there were 16.

    I won’t reveal the year I received it, but it is pretty old. That’s why I asked Bill Urell how long ago he wrote it. And now that I see the wording is the same, I’m also wondering whether he wrote it at all.

    Since the author is unknown (????), here’s the other “symptoms” listed:

    *Exhaustion – Allowing yourself to become overly tired or in poor health….

    *Depression – Unreasonable and unaccountable despair may occur in cycles and should be dealt with – talked about

    *Frustration – At people and also because things may not be going your way. Remember, everything is not going to be just the way you want it.

    *Self-pity – “Why do these things happen to me?” or “Nobody appreciates all I am doing (for them)!!”

    *Expecting Too Much From Others – “I’ve changed, why hasn’t everybody else?” It’s a plus if they do – but it is still your problem if they do not.They may not trust you yet, may still be looking for futher proof. You cannot expect others to change their lives just because you have.

    *Letting Up On Discipline – Prayer, meditation, daily inventory, meeting attendance. This can stem from complacency or boredom. You cannot afford to be bored with your program. The cost of relapse is always too great.

    (I gotta go…I’ll post the rest later)

    #159202
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Here’s the rest:

    *Use of Mood Altering Chemicals – You may feel the need to ease things with a pill, and your doctor may go along with you. You may never had a problem with chemicals other than alcohol but you can easily lose sobriety starting this way – about the most subtle way to have a relapse. Remember, you will be changing. The reverse is true to drug dependent people who start to drink.

    *Wanting Too Much – Do not set goals you cannot reach without normal effort. Do not expect too much. It’s always great when good things you were not expecting happens. You will get what you are entitled to as long as you do your best, but maybe not as soon as you think you should. “Happiness is not having what you want but wanting what you have.”

    *Forgetting Gratitude – You may be looking negatively on your life, concentrating on problems that still are not totally corrected. Nobody wants to be a Pollyana – but it is good to remember where you started from and how much better life is now.

    *”It Can’t Happen To Me” – This is a dangerous thinking. Almost anything can happen to you and is more likely to if you get careless. Remember, you have a progressive disease and you will be in worse shape if you relapse.

    *Omnipotence – This is a feeling that results from a combination of many of the above. You now have all the answers for yourself & others. No one can tell you anything. You ignore suggestions or advice from others. Relapse is probably imminent unless drastic change takes place.

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